Lavender

Lavender

Things are coming along on Wozani Farm. This past weekend we got our first bed of lavender in the ground 4 rows of 12 to be exact, a solid 48 plants. Since before we moved to the farm, we had plans for lots and lots of lavender. For bees to be buzzing, and scents to be drifting. Besides being pretty to look at and lovely to smell — it has the potential to be a cash crop for the farm. Or so we’ve read.

With this first planting, we decided to go with Hidcote Lavender. Hidcote is a cultivar of English Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) with deep violet blue blossoms and silvery foliage. This variety does well in Colorado, and winters well. Mature size averages around 2ft wide and 2ft tall.

Since this was an investment, And we’ve read if done well, these plants will last up to 15 years, we wanted to ensure that the soil was properly amended. Fortunately with lavender, they like bad soil. The only amending you typically need is to correct the pH. Lavender does well in soils with a pH between 6.5-7.5. So, Liz picked up a soil test kit and the pH was a perfect 7.0! — no amending was necessary. We used this one, the Luster Leaf 1601 Rapitest Test Kit for Soil pH, Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Potash https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0000DI845/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_9ul7CbA2SB2V7 we got ours from The good ol Home Depot.

The other thing that lavender hates is a wet clay soil. So as ours is sandy, we are hoping for amazingly great things, due to its great drainage potential.

When planting lavender, it is very important to plan for weed suppression. Lavender will grow really well in poor soils, but they don’t tolerate crowding from weeds well. So we laid out commercial grade woven landscape fabric as an initial barrier. A lot of farms burn circles to allow for their plants, however we did not have the tools for that, so we cut “X’s” After this we covered the bed with straw and straw matting as a mulch. We found the straw matting at the Tractor supply store for not much at all.

Hopefully, we will start seeing harvestable flowers from this bed in about 1-2 years! We will keep you updated.

Wozani – The Meaning.

DSC_0085In both Xhosa and IsiZulu the word Wozani means Come.

We believe that this piece of land is here for more than us. And we believe that what is ours belongs to God, so we feel strongly that God is calling us to create a bringing together of sorts here on this land.

When we went through farm names, we thought of everything from Long meadow farm, to Shalom, or Narrow Field and Cotton wood farm. We wanted the name to hold meaning, and description, but not to hold us to one type of crop or venture.

We knew ultimately that our land will be used for community. We want it to bring people together, to build people up, to spread love and hope and beauty.

I truly think that a whole lot of pain and issues we all face today is because of lack of community, lack of coming together, lack of getting our bubbles popped and sharing our depths with others.

Growing up in South Africa, Xhosa was my dad’s first language, and we lived many years in KwaZulu-Natal where Zulu was the mother tongue, so when looking into words, of course Xhosa and Zulu both spoke to us, and having them share the same word for the meaning COME was special.

Whatever Wozani becomes, and OH MY GOODNESS, the ideas are many and HUGE, Wozani will be a place of community. A place to build. A place of peace.

Here are some of our ideas, but we’d love to hear your ideas with what the 4 acres of land could be used for. Or even expand on some of ours?

  • Community horse.
  • Classes for veggies, homesteading, plants.
  • CSA
  • Community sensory garden
  • Community events
  • Venues
  • Rainer’s practice or store front near the busy road.
  • Lavender fields

So WOZANI friends!!

Please come and visit us!!